Discussions concerning union had begun at a conference at Tranquebar (now Tarangambadi) in 1919, and in 1947, after India attained independence, the union was completed. On 27th September 1947, the General Council of Church of India, Pakistan, Burma and Ceylon, General Assembly of South India United Church and South India Provincial Synod of Methodist Church joined together to from the CHURCH OF SOUTH INDIA as the largest united national church in India, at St. George’s Cathedral, Chennai.  The continued growth was further enriched with the joining of the churches of Basel Mission and the Anglican Diocese of Nandyal.   Thus, the Church of South India was the result of the union of churches of varying traditions Anglican, Methodist, Congregational, Presbyterian, and Reformed. Organized into 22 dioceses, each under the spiritual supervision of a bishop, the church as a whole is governed by a synod, which elects a moderator (presiding bishop) every 2 years.  A unique church was born out of the blending of the Episcopal and non – Episcopal traditions as a gift of God to the people of India and as a visible sign of the ecclesiastical unity for the universal church.  The Scriptures are the ultimate standard of faith and practice. The historic creeds are accepted as interpreting the biblical faith, and the sacraments of baptism and the Lord’s Supper are recognized as of binding obligation. The Church of South India has its own service book and communion service, both of which draw from several denominational sources. The union, especially in its reconciliation of the Anglican doctrine of apostolic succession with the views of other denominations, is often cited as a landmark in the ecumenical movement. The church accepts the Lambeth Quadrilateral as its basis and recognises the historical episcopate in its constitutional form. The C.S.I. Church is the second largest church in India based on the population of members, next to the Roman Catholic church, and also the largest Protestant denomination in the country.